Nov 15, 2013

Christmas Mason Jar Vase

This is an easy Christmas craft that's easily completed in an hour.  The hardest part is picking an image for the front!  I used a vintage Crown jar, but you could use any jar you have kicking around. 



I painted my jar with Cece Caldwell's chalk and clay paint and distressed it here and there.  Then I printed off my image and glued it to the front.  I applied diamond dust over the picture and silver glitter around the edges.  I recommend glittering after you glue the picture on... it's just easier that way because you don't have to worry about knocking off the glitter. 


As a finishing touch I tied some jute and baker's twine around the top rim. 



I'm using it as a holder for some Christmas greenery, but it would look great with a votive candle lit inside, too!


Linking to:
Funky Junk Interiors
The Shabby Creek Cottage: Holiday Mason Jar Craft Extravaganza
Tatertots & Jello
The 36th Avenue
Coastal Charm
The Scoop
Domestically Speaking


Nov 13, 2013

From Country to Cottage - White Cupboard Makeover

Well, our little mister is just over two months now.  I haven't worked on any furniture since the summer, but I have a few projects that I haven't shared here that I will be posting about in the next week or so.  Besides looking after our baby we've been busy getting our house ready to go on the market.  So, there hasn't been much too much extra time for painting around here!  I started to haul out my Christmas decorations today, so hopefully I will be sharing a bit of that  here soon, too. 

I had bought this cupboard at a yard sale in July for $20.00  It was actually painted white already. 

However, some people just shouldn't be allowed to paint furniture.  The entire surface was coated with fuzzy lint dried into the paint.  So, I stripped it down to the pine.  Now, because I was 8 months pregnant, I used a product from Home Hardware called Natura Safe Strip. 
1L Safe Strip Wood Stripper
However, I mostly was able to just scrape the paint off because they hadn't sanded before painting and the paint was actually pretty peely. 

Here it is after I got all the paint off the outside.


So much better painted white!
 
 
 
It replaced the dresser that we had in the kitchen.  It definitely fits the space a lot better, and makes it feel more open while still offering me the same amount of storage.  Plus the white lightens up the space a bit and matches my kitchen cupboards better. 
 
Here's the dresser we had there before.  This picture was taken last Christmas.   
 

The paper on the doors is vintage wallpaper.  The wire was in there already.  I used Cece Caldwell chalk and clay paint in Simply White and I finished it with clear and dark wax. 
 
I've added just a little bit of winter/Christmas to the top of it. 
 
I actually painted the inside pink, but I didn't take any pictures of that because it needs organizing... again. 
 
 
Linking to:

Sep 13, 2013

It's A Boy!

Our son Micah, was born early Tuesday morning (Sept. 10) . We're both doing fine, however, at this time I will probably not be putting any new posts up.  I am looking forward to painting furniture again... but probably not for a another few months!

Sep 1, 2013

Eastlake Rocking Chair Before and After And a Tip for Polishing Wood

A lady who I have done some work for in the past, contacted me this summer about a rocking chair she wished to be redone. 
 
This is what it looked like when she dropped it off for me. 
 
 As you can tell, the fabric had definitely seen better days.  Also, the whole top piece was broken off and needed to be reattached.  You maybe can't tell that from the picture. 

She left me with the responsibility of picking out some new fabric for it, but said she liked greens/earthy tones and wanted something that was maybe more traditional to suit the style of the chair. 

So, here it is all done up.  It was actually easier than I thought.  If you have ever recovered a dining chair seat, this is definitely a step up, but still easily accomplishable.  A good tip is to save the original fabric and use it for a pattern when cutting out your new pieces.  Luckily I didn't have to replace any of the padding.  


Now you can actually sit on it! 

My husband reattached the piece at the top for me, since it involved a drill and a dowel, and I've yet to learn how to use a drill. 



When she dropped it off the wood frame was a little dull and dirty and bit scratched up in places.   A natural fix for this (if the scratches aren't too horrible)  is to mix up some vegetable oil and lemon juice and to give it a good polishing with that.  I wipe it on, then take a clean paper towel and make sure to rub off any excess.  You'd actually be amazed at the difference this can make. 
 
 
 
This is an older rocking chair, so it's the perfect height for short people like me!


Aug 20, 2013

Ruffle Curtain Tutorial

So, last year I posted about the ruffled burlap and muslin curtain I made for our back door, which opens into the laundry/utility room.  I got an email the other day inquiring about a  tutorial for it.  Looking back at the comments on the original post, I saw that a few people had also been interested in one.  So, better late than never, here's a few quick tips to recreating this look.  Since I did this last summer, I don't have any pictures to go with the steps, so feel free to ask any questions if you find something needs clarifying.


For the Back:
-I started out with a plain piece of white fabric.  (You can use any fabric you like for this step, but if you don't want to line your curtain, I'd suggest you use a fabric that you won't mind seeing from outside the window.  I didn't line mine, so white was best.) 

-Hem each edge of the fabric so it's the size that you want your finished curtain to be.  You don't need to worry about extra width for gathering at this point.

For the Ruffles:
-Each of my ruffles are approx. 4" finished.  For each ruffle, you'll want the piece you're using to be approx. double the width of the curtain. 

-The muslin ruffles I simply ripped and left unfinished since I was going for a bit of a shabby look.

-For the burlap ruffles, I did hem the edges, because burlap frays really easily. 

-To create the ruffles, I used a "ruffler", which is a special foot for my sewing machine.  But, if you don't have one, you simply set your machine to the basting stitch (or the longest stitch length possible), sew along the edge and then pull the bottom thread to gather the material.   


Attaching the Ruffles:
You'll want to make sure you have enough ruffles to cover the entire curtain. 

-Attach the ruffles starting at the bottom.  I overlapped mine a little.   How much you overlap each ruffle is personal preference, but do try to keep it uniform and straight :)  You can sew the ruffles on, or cheat and glue them on. 

-I alternated between muslin and burlap ruffles.  However, you could just use burlap, or perhaps only muslin... or really any fabrics you like.

-Once I got to the top, I folded my last piece of burlap in half lengthwise and then sewed it on, in order to make a pocket for the rod to slip through. 

Hang and admire your handiwork!  I used a piece of lace to tie it together in the center. 



There you go.  I hope these instructions are clear enough.  Like I said at the beginning, if you have any further questions or need more clarification feel free to contact me. 

And... on a side note... it's only 11 days to my due date.  Hopefully our little one will be joining us soon :-)


 To view the original post, click here

Linking to these great parties:
The 36th Avenue
The Shabby Creek Cottage
My Repurposed Life
Living Better Together
The Shabby Nest
All Things Burlap Linky Party
The Cottage Market
Tatertots and Jello Link Party Palooza
Funky Junk Interiors
Classy Clutter
The Scoop
 
 

Jul 29, 2013

I Painted Something Red?!!

Ever since I started painting furniture, I have admired pictures of pieces that were painted red.  But, I never had the 'courage' to do it myself.  I even went so far as to pick up a sample of Cece Caldwell's Traverse City Cherry Red about a year ago but could never figure out what to use it on.  So when I recently picked up this mid-century chair, I finally decided to try it out. 


Here's what it looked like when I brought it home. (Unfortunately... or fortunately?) I think the auctioneer where I bought it is beginning to realize that I'll take home any stray chair because he gave me a super deal for this one and a bunch of others that day. 

The hardest part of this makeover was finding fabric to go with the colour.  Finally, I happened upon this happy print at Fabricland the last week. 



I used clear and dark wax on this chair, because I found without the dark wax deepening the colour, it was a little too 'pinky' for my taste. 


What do you think of red furniture?
Linking To:
The Scoop
The Dedicated House
Domestically Speaking
The 36th Avenue
Southern Lovely
The Shabby Creek Cottage
My Repurposed Life
Miss Mustard Seed
The Shabby Nest

Jul 10, 2013

Vintage Black Dresser

 This is one of three dressers that I bought all in one weekend in June.  I showed you one already, here.  Not sure if I should admit to this, or not, but we bought this one on the way to church Sunday morning.  I saw it sitting there at a yard sale as we were driving by and I knew that if it was a good price, that it wouldn't be there later on the way back.  I convinced my husband to pull over and as we were looking it over and debating the merits of bringing home another yet another dresser, the lady running the sale offered to lower her price, and of course, that made it irresistible and it ended up in the back of our vehicle.


I used a new Cece Caldwell paint colour, Beckley Coal.  It's a nice shade, black, but not a deep, deep dark black. 


As you can see, there is a lot of variation of colour in this paint.  It had great coverage, too.  This was just one coat of paint.  This dresser is finished simply in the clear wax. 


After I got it all cleaned up and painted  and posted for sale, my husband started thinking about  wanting it.  You see, this dresser is extremely well made and the drawers on it are huge.  And when I say huge I actually mean ginormous.  Seriously... if you were skinny enough, you could probably hide in them.  He was liking all the potential storage they offered.  And since his current dresser wasn't all that big, I agreed to the swap. 

Here it is pre-painting and minus it's drawers.  The other two dressers I bought were hiding behind this one.  It actually came with that round mirror that's peeking through, but since our bedroom is sloped there was no room for that, and personally, I thought it was kind of ugly, I sold it at our yard sale on the weekend. 


The top drawer had this interesting rose detailing on it.  Painting it over and adding a cute graphic certainly crossed my mind, but I ended up leaving it alone. 


I chose to paint it black when I was thinking of resale.  If I had known my husband was going to claim it, I might have gone with a different shade.  What would you have done? 

Linking to:
The Shabby Creek Cottage
My Repurposed Life
Miss Mustard Seed
The Shabby Nest
The Cottage Market
Five Days Five Ways
Tatertots And Jello
Funky Junk Interiors
Classy Clutter
Coastal Charm
Sourthern Lovely 
The 36th Avenue
Domestically Speaking 




Jun 27, 2013

Antique Chairs With Drop Cloth Seats

If I admit to how long these chairs have been hanging around here seatless, will you promise to still keep reading my blog?



They would originally have had caned seats.  However, when I purchased them the caning was long gone and someone had added tapestry to the seats.  That fabric was literally disintegrating and I removed it, along with the straw/grass stuffing right away when I brought them home last August. 



I think part of the reason that it took me so long to work on them was because I wasn't sure if I should attempt re-caning them, or not.  I finally decided to just go ahead and have plywood seats made for them.  We visited my parents over the father's day weekend and I asked my dad if he would pretty-please cut me out new seats.  Thanks Pops!  And here they are with some brand new drop cloth and batting added to them. 



The graphics on the seats are courtesy of the Graphics Fairy.  I used iron-on transfers that I printed myself.  So as not to have a lot of extra shininess around the edges, I cut everything out real close to their outlines and didn't leave any big blank white spaces. 


I debated on using one graphic on both chairs, or two different ones.  As you can see, I decided to go with two different ones. 


I actually had no desire to paint these, as I thought the worn wood tones and patina were too lovely to cover up.  What do you think?  Would you have painted them?

Linking to:
Miss Mustard Seed
The Shabby Nest
Finding Fabulous
Five Days: Five Ways
Tatertots and Jello
Funky Junk Interiors

Jun 17, 2013

White Dresser With Lightly Whitewashed Top

This is a dresser I picked up at a yardsale a few Saturdays ago.  I bought three dressers that weekend.  Yes, I guess I was a little dresser crazy that day.  Anyways, two of the three are done.  And this one is sold already, actually. 


It was a pine dresser.  The lady selling it told me that her and her husband had bought it from Sears right after they were married.  It was unfinished and she stained and varathaned it.  Well, that was a few years ago and in the meantime it had gotten scratched and yellowed... you know the drill right?

Anyways, I sanded the top down and stained it with dark walnut stain.  To see more instructions on how I did that, you can view this post on refinishing. 

The body was sanded lightly, primed and then painted with Rustoleum semi-gloss white.  I did distress this piece, but only lightly around the edges this time.   


After I painted the body, I decided to do a sort-of whitewash treatment on the top to give it a worn/beachy/older feel.  I watered down some white paint and using a cloth wiped it over the top of the dresser.  Now normally, you could just wipe the excess away, but I was working outside and it was fairly warm, so it pretty much dried right away.  So I took some 100 grit sandpaper and did some sanding to give it a more authentic look.  The paint sort of settled into the grain of the wood. 



One other thing I did was change out the original hardware with some pulls and knobs I had gotten on clearance at Lowe's, maybe a year ago.  I've wanted to use them ever since, but they've never worked with anything I tried them out on.  I had the exact number of pulls and knobs I needed for this dresser, so I guess they were meant to go on it!

Hopefully soon I will be sharing with you the second dresser I picked up that day.

Linking to:
Coastal Charm
The Dedicated House
The 36th Avenue
Domestically Speaking
Southern Lovely
The Shabby Creek Cottage
My Repurposed Life
Finding Fabulous
Miss Mustard Seed
The Shabby Nest
The Cottage market
Five Days...Five Ways
Tatertots And Jello
Funky Junk Interiors
Classy Clutter

Jun 9, 2013

White French Provincial Nightstand

I recently acquired this cute little nightstand at the local auction I sometimes attend.  Sorry, I forgot to take a before picture on this one.  It wasn't your typical cheaper quality creamy/yellow with gold trim piece, but rather it was oak.  I had to fight for it a little, but the scruffy man bidding against me gave up fairly quickly.  I guess he realised it was a little too girly for him.  

I painted it white using Rustoleum semi-gloss white paint.  (The one in the can, not the spray paint.)  I painted it outside using a respirator.  Since being pregnant, I've been more concerned about fumes and stuff like that.  But it's probably not a bad idea to use a respirator all the time anyway, though. Seriously... have you read some of the warnings on paint cans?  Rustoleum's wasn't as bad as some, but I will mostly be sticking to Cece Caldwell paint, because it's really a lot safer for you. 


I didn't distress this piece, I didn't glaze it or dark wax it.  I didn't stencil it.  I didn't even change out or paint the hardware.  I didn't do anything fancy to it, yet it sold fairly quickly.

Wish I had room to keep every piece I redo!


Linking to:
Coastal Charm
The 36th Avenue
Domestically Speaking
The Shabby Creek Cottage
Miss Mustard Seed
The Shabby Nest
My Repurposed Life
The Cottage Market
Five Days...Five Ways
Classy Clutter
Southern Lovely
Tatertots and Jello
Funky Junk Interiors
Classy Clutter



May 30, 2013

Black Duncan Phyfe Makeover

I'm not sure whether or not I've mentioned it on here or not, but my husband and I are expecting our first child towards the end of August.  That's my excuse for not posting anything in a month!  I was talking to my mom last night and she asked when I was going to post again.... Her exact words were... "I keep going to your site, but there's never anything new anymore!" Ok mums... here's something new for you! 
 
 
 
I purchased this table recently at an auction.  I was the only one who bid on it... are you surprised?
 

Ummm yeah, the veneer on the top was a little rough.  As soon as he took it out of the car for me, my husband ripped it all off.  Now most people would have been thankful that this step was done for them.  My reaction?  Hey... the before the picture would have been so much more dramatic if all that veneer was still there... thanks a lot!  My husband's solution was to lay the veneer back on and take a picture for me.  So in all reality, the veneer has already been removed in this picture.

I painted it with Cece Caldwell chalk paint in Vermont Slate.  But I added black colorant to it to make it a lot darker.  I just bought a can of Beckley Coal, and it's actually very similar to this colour I created on my own. 



This is a such a nice style of furniture. 

I finished it off with light distressing and clear wax.  When I distress chalk paint, I like to use a wet rag and wipe the paint away.  I feel it gives an authentic worn look. 

I've got a few more projects to share soon.  I'm just waiting for a sunny morning to take the pictures.  I bought three dresser this past weekend... yeah, I'm a little crazy.  Two are done already though, believe it or not. 
Here's a sneak peak of the first one I started. 



My Repurposed Life
The Shabby Nest
Miss Mustard Seed
Chic on a Shoestring
Five Days... Five Ways
The Cottage Market
Tatertots and Jello
Funky Junk Interiors
Coastal Charm
The Shabby Creek Cottage
 The 36th Avenue











Apr 25, 2013

Beautiful Large Sheet Music Flower

About a month ago I was browsing a linky party when I came across this absolutely beautiful flower by Whimsical Perspective.  I loved it so much that I literally started making one right away.  This isn't totally like me.  I usually sit on an idea for a while before I get around to doing it.  I guess I really must have liked this idea.  I'm not going to give you a tuturiol on the process because Laura did a great job and you can check out hers here.

Here is my version:
And here is Laura's:


I had such fun making mine that I had my sister-in-law help me make two more to put up at church for spring/easter decor.  We used multi-coloured scrapbook paper because they were going on a plain white wall and we wanted them to be nice and bright. If you're going to make one using scrapbook paper, it's way easier to use the thin paper as opposed to thicker cardstock-like paper because it's more flexible. 

Linking to:
My Repurposed Life
Classy Clutter
A Pinteresting Link Party